Changing Ideals in Modern Architecture, 1750-1950

Changing Ideals in Modern Architecture, 1750-1950

eBook - 1998
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Collins explains what Revivalism, Rationalism, Eclecticism, and Functionalism meant to those who practised them, examining the impact that social forces and the other arts and sciences had on architectural styles while recognizing the tectonic continuities that underlie the seeming ruptures between pre-modern, modern, and post-modern approaches to design. His work is infused with a deep sympathy for the classical spirit of the eighteenth century and he argued rigorously and passionately that Enlightenment ideas could be of real value to the architects of his generation, particularly since technology had made it possible to use them effectively. Collins's plea for sensitivity to tradition and the urban fabric while encouraging technological innovation and unprecedented programs makes his thought just as vital today as it was ahead of its time when first published. Collins had long wished to see an affordable, fully illustrated edition of his book and McGill-Queen's University Press and the McGill School of Architecture are proud to at long last fulfil this wish. The new edition includes a biographical sketch of Collins, a brief publication history of the work, and an introductory essay by Kenneth Frampton that discusses the importance of the work at the time it was first published and highlights its relevance for the architectural problems of today. Like the classic works of Hitchcock, Giedion, Pevsner, and Benevolo, Changing Ideals in Modern Architecture is essential reading and forms a striking contrast with other works on modernism, such as Reyner Banham's. It will be pertinent to all those interested in architectural history and theory, modern history, history of ideas, and aesthetics.


McGill Queens Univ Pr
Changing Ideals in Modern Architecture revolutionized the understanding of modernism in architecture, pushing back the sense of its origin from the early twentieth century to the 1750s and thus placing architectural thought within the a broader context of Western intellectual history. This new edition of Peter Collins's ground-breaking study includes all seventy-two illustrations of the hard cover original edition, which has been out of print since 1967, and restores the large format.

Collins explains what Revivalism, Rationalism, Eclecticism, and Functionalism meant to those who practised them, examining the impact that social forces and the other arts and sciences had on architectural styles while recognizing the tectonic continuities that underlie the seeming ruptures between pre-modern, modern, and post-modern approaches to design. His work is infused with a deep sympathy for the classical spirit of the eighteenth century and he argued rigorously and passionately that Enlightenment ideas could be of real value to the architects of his generation, particularly since technology had made it possible to use them effectively. Collins's plea for sensitivity to tradition and the urban fabric while encouraging technological innovation and unprecedented programs makes his thought just as vital today as it was ahead of its time when first published. Collins had long wished to see an affordable, fully illustrated edition of his book and McGill-Queen's University Press and the McGill School of Architecture are proud to at long last fulfil this wish. The new edition includes a biographical sketch of Collins, a brief publication history of the work, and an introductory essay by Kenneth Frampton that discusses the importance of the work at the time it was first published and highlights its relevance for the architectural problems of today. Like the classic works of Hitchcock, Giedion, Pevsner, and Benevolo, Changing Ideals in Modern Architecture is essential reading and forms a striking contrast with other works on modernism, such as Reyner Banham's. It will be pertinent to all those interested in architectural history and theory, modern history, history of ideas, and aesthetics.

Collins explains what Revivalism, Rationalism, Eclecticism, and Functionalism meant to those who practised them, examining the impact that social forces and the other arts and sciences had on architectural styles while recognizing the tectonic continuities that underlie the seeming ruptures between pre-modern, modern, and post-modern approaches to design. His work is infused with a deep sympathy for the classical spirit of the eighteenth century and he argued rigorously and passionately that Enlightenment ideas could be of real value to the architects of his generation, particularly since technology had made it possible to use them effectively. Collins's plea for sensitivity to tradition and the urban fabric while encouraging technological innovation and unprecedented programs makes his thought just as vital today as it was ahead of its time when first published.Collins had long wished to see an affordable, fully illustrated edition of his book and McGill-Queen's University Press and the McGill School of Architecture are proud to at long last fulfil this wish. The new edition includes a biographical sketch of Collins, a brief publication history of the work, and an introductory essay by Kenneth Frampton that discusses the importance of the work at the time it was first published and highlights its relevance for the architectural problems of today. Like the classic works of Hitchcock, Giedion, Pevsner, and Benevolo, Changing Ideals in Modern Architecture is essential reading and forms a striking contrast with other works on modernism, such as Reyner Banham's. It will be pertinent to all those interested in architectural history and theory, modern history, history of ideas, and aesthetics.
Peter Collins's classic study surveys two hundred years of architectural theories and ideas. It explains what Revivalism, Rationalism, Eclecticism, and Functionalism meant to those who practised them, examining the influence of the other arts and sciences on architectural theory, and analysing notions that are commonly used in discussions about modern architecture but have implications frequently unsuspected or overlooked. Infused with a deep sympathy for the nineteenth century, Changing Ideals in Modern Architecture suggests that many nineteenth-century ideas can be of real value to practising architects, particularly now that technology has made it possible to put them into effect properly.

Publisher: Montreal, Que. : McGill-Queen's University Press, ©1998
ISBN: 9780773567054
0773567054
0773517049
9780773517042
Characteristics: 1 online resource (308 pages, [40] pages of plates) : illustrations

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