The Long Exile

The Long Exile

A True Story of Deception and Survival Amongst the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic

Book - 2006
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Random House, Inc.

In 1922 an Irish-American adventurer named Robert Flaherty made a film about Inuit life in the Arctic. Nanook of the North featured a mythical Eskimo hunter who lived in an igloo with his family in a frozen Eden. Nanook’s story captured the world’s imagination.

Thirty years later, the Canadian government forcibly relocated three dozen Inuit from the east coast of Hudson Bay to a region of the high artic that was 1,200 miles farther north. Hailing from a land rich in caribou and arctic foxes, whales and seals, pink saxifrage and heather, the Inuit’s destination was Ellesmere Island, an arid and desolate landscape of shale and ice virtually devoid of life. The most northerly landmass on the planet, Ellesmere is blanketed in darkness for four months of the year. There the exiles were left to live on their own with little government support and few provisions.

Among this group was Josephie Flaherty, the unrecognized, half-Inuit son of Robert Flaherty, who never met his father. In a narrative rich with human drama and heartbreak, Melanie McGrath uses the story of three generations of the Flaherty family—the filmmaker; his illegitimate son, Josephie; and Josephie’s daughters, Mary and Martha—to bring this extraordinary tale of mistreatment and deprivation to life.



Baker & Taylor
A study of deception and survival set amidst the Inuit communities of the Canadian Arctic describes how, in 1953, three dozen Inuit were forcibly relocated from the east coast of Hudson Bay to the high arctic by the Canadian government, focusing on the effects of the relocation on members of the Flaherty family and on the Inuit community of Ellesmere Island. 25,000 first printing.

Book News
Arriving in the Inuit community of Inukjuak, on the east coast of the Hudson Bay, in 1920, Robert Flaherty set about filming his influential film Nanook of the North. After finishing his filming, Flaherty would leave never to return, but the son he fathered, Josephie Flaherty, would remain behind to suffer with his community as they were forcibly moved hundreds of miles north by the Canadian government some 30 years later, not to receive any form of redress until the mid-1990s. This book both describes the making of the movie and the influence it had on perceptions of the Inuit and the fortunes of Robert Flaherty's Inuit descendants as they coped with exile and hardship. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Blackwell North Amer
In 1922 an Irish-American adventurer named Robert Flaherty made a film about Inuit life in the Arctic. Nanook of the North featured a mythical Eskimo hunter who lived in an igloo with his family in a frozen Eden. Nanook's story captured the world's imagination.
Thirty years later, the Canadian government forcibly relocated three dozen Inuit from the east coast of Hudson Bay to a region of the high arctic that was 1,200 miles farther north. Hailing from a land rich in caribou and arctic foxes, whales and seals, pink saxifrage and heather, the Inuit were taken to Ellesmere Island, an arid and desolate landscape of shale and ice virtually devoid of life. The most northerly landmass on the planet, Ellesmere is blanketed in darkness for four months of the year. There the exiles were left to live on their own with little government support and few provisions.
Among this group was Josephie Flaherty, the unrecognized half-Inuit son of Robert Flaherty, who never met his father. In a narrative rich with human drama and heartbreak, Melanie McGrath uses the story of three generations of the Flaherty family - the filmmaker; his illegitimate son, Josephie; and Josephie's daughters, Mary and Martha - to bring this tale of mistreatment and deprivation to life.

Baker
& Taylor

Describes how, in 1953, three dozen Inuit were forcibly relocated from the east coast of Hudson Bay to the high arctic by the Canadian government, focusing on the effects of the relocation on members of the Flaherty family and on the Inuit community of Ellesmere Island.

Publisher: London : Fourth Estate, 2006
ISBN: 9781400040476
9780007157969
0007157967
Characteristics: 392 p. : maps ; 22 cm

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u
uzebdrumz
Dec 18, 2014

This book gives answers to the questions of why the Inuit never migrated South, why they stayed in the North & how they were transplanted to the far North. Their treatment is an abomination of human rights abuses & their survival is a testimonial to their industrious & unrelenting determination to survive in conditions that would quickly kill anyone on this planet. The book is focussed on a few families in particular in order to develop the character & personality of specific Inuit people, but in concluding chapters, the magnitude & devastation of the Inuit way of life is fully displayed with statistics & general facts. The decades-long revisionist history provided by the Canadian Government disseminated through the media is a perfect example of colonial hubris & willful blindness, resulting in a systemic disregard of the facts. On August 18, 2010 the Government of Canada issued an apology for the relocation of the Inuit.

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